Indiana Legislature introduces new bills to legalize marijuana

Purchasing and using marijuana in Indiana is a felony. But with a new legislative session in Indianapolis, several lawmakers have introduced bills revising marijuana laws. Possession of small amounts of recreational marijuana could become legal. “I’d sell it as long as it’s legal,” said Gina Stoner and her husband own Dew Drops CBD in New Albany, Indiana. Stoner says being able to sell marijuana would be a game changer for her business and the entire state. “I think it would be great to help Indiana with taxes. and all cities in Indiana,” Stoner said. Others in New Albany agree that legalizing and taxing marijuana sales could improve state finances. “Anyone who smokes it is going to smoke it,” said Jake Moon. “If you die If you can get tax revenue for it, there’s no good reason not to.” Not everyone agrees. Kevin Page has lived in Indiana for almost 40 years. Unemployment and crime increase. “I think everything shows that any kind of drug like this, more crime, more “It’s going to cause family problems and more community problems. I’m not all for it,” he told the state Capitol, where legislation is being introduced in both chambers by lawmakers from both parties addressing aspects of cannabis reform.

Purchasing and using marijuana in Indiana is a felony. But with a new legislative session in Indianapolis, several lawmakers have introduced bills revising marijuana laws.

Possession of small amounts of recreational marijuana could become legal.

“I would sell it as long as everything is legal,” Gina Stoner said.

She and her husband own Dew Drops CBD in New Albany, Indiana.

Stoner says being able to sell marijuana would be a game changer for her business and the entire state.

“I think it would be great to help Indiana with taxes. It would bring in a lot of revenue and help our city, New Albany, and all cities in Indiana,” Stoner said.

Others in New Albany agree that legalizing and taxing marijuana sales could improve state finances.

“Anyone who smokes it will smoke it,” said Jake Moon. “If you can get the tax revenue for it, there’s no good reason not to.”

Not everyone agrees.

Kevin Page has lived in Indiana for almost 40 years.

He believes that a move to legalize cannabis would result in people becoming increasingly lazy and increasing unemployment and crime.

“I think everything proves that any kind of drug will cause more crime, more family problems and more community problems. I’m not for it at all,” he said.

Differing opinions in Southern Indiana and the State Capitol, where legislation is being introduced in both chambers by legislators from both parties dealing with aspects of cannabis reform.

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