Indiana, Ohio Special Olympics compete in Perfect North for Winter Games

As fresh machine snow fell over Perfect North Slopes on Tuesday morning, so did the opportunity to offer dignity and competitive fun to athletes of all skill levels. Tuesday was the final day of competition for the 2023 Indiana and Ohio Second Annual Combined Special Olympics Winter Games held at Perfect North Slopes in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. One hundred and thirty-seven athletes came from all two states to compete in the three-day event. Sunday began with opening ceremonies. On Monday, athletes aged nine to 64 could choose between skiing, snowboarding or snowshoeing as their preferred sport and take part in trials to learn and compete. Tuesday is reserved for competitions and closing ceremonies. Through fundraising, The Special Olympics offers athletes the opportunity to compete, travel and lodging for free. Indiana Special Olympics snowboarder Kendra Franklin shared how she sees Special Olympics as a way to bring dignity and visibility to athletes of diverse abilities. “I hope there’s a better chance for people without intellectual disabilities to see how we work with intellectual disabilities,” Franklin said. “We’re very competitive, you know, it’s human nature. We are very competitive. We love the same sports that people without intellectual disabilities play. It might just be a bit more difficult, do you know what we can do and if you have any questions, come and ask us. We are more than willing to answer your questions. Just ask us.” After the state-level Winter Games, well-performing athletes have the opportunity to potentially qualify for the Special Olympics National Games and World Games in years to come.

As fresh machine snow fell across the slopes of Perfect North on Tuesday morning, so did the opportunity to offer dignity and competitive fun to athletes of all levels.

Tuesday marked the final day of competition at the second annual combined 2023 Indiana-Ohio Special Olympics Winter Games, held at Perfect North Slopes in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.

One hundred and thirty-seven athletes came from all parts of the two states to compete in the three-day event. Sunday began with opening ceremonies. On Monday, athletes aged nine to 64 could choose between skiing, snowboarding or snowshoeing as their preferred sport and take part in trials to learn and compete. Tuesday is reserved for competitions and closing ceremonies.

Through fundraising, The Special Olympics offers athletes the opportunity to compete, travel and lodging for free.

Indiana Special Olympics snowboarder Kendra Franklin shared how she sees Special Olympics as a way to bring dignity and visibility to athletes of diverse abilities.

“I hope there’s a better chance for people without intellectual disabilities to see how we work with intellectual disabilities,” Franklin said. “We’re very competitive, you know, it’s human nature. We are very competitive. We love the same sports that people without intellectual disabilities play. It might just be a bit more difficult, do you know what we can do and if you have any questions, come and ask us. We are more than willing to answer your questions. Just ask us.”

After the state-level Winter Games, well-performing athletes have the opportunity to potentially qualify for the Special Olympics National Games and World Games in years to come.

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