What’s the deal with Indiana’s expensive egg prices?

Egg Prices Are Rising, But Why?

As the world returns to normal, we see prices rising and hear all sorts of rumors of inflation. According to the USDA, total grocery store prices at the end of 2022 were about 12% higher than grocery prices in 2021.

Photo by Maria Lin Kim on Unsplash

Photo by Maria Lin Kim on Unsplash

There is some good (similar) news though, it seems that rapidly rising food prices should slow down in 2023. The USDA goes on to say:

Food prices are expected to grow more slowly in 2023 than in 2022, but still above the historical average. In 2023, all grocery prices are expected to rise between 3.5 and 4.5 percent, home dining prices are expected to rise between 3.0 and 4.0 percent, and away-from-home grocery prices are expected to rise between 4.0 percent and 5.0 percent rise.

Lately, however, it seems that everyone online is talking specifically about the price of eggs.

Photo by CA Creative on Unsplash

Photo by CA Creative on Unsplash

My apologies for the pun, I had to make something a little lighthearted in this heavy article.

It seems I’ve started seeing memes and people posting about the price of eggs all over Facebook. Although I’ve noticed that my overall grocery bill has increased quite a bit, I didn’t pay too much attention to the price of eggs until recently. I was shocked when I picked up a dozen eggs and saw that they cost over $5! And it wasn’t even the fancy cage-free eggs, these were the standard big eggs.

Photo by Mustafa Bashari on Unsplash

Photo by Mustafa Bashari on Unsplash

How much are eggs on site? Here are the current prices for a dozen large grade A eggs in Evansville via Instacart:

  • Schnuck $5.39
  • Aldi $4.39
  • Meijer $5.39
  • Fresh Thyme Market $4.29
  • Target $4.49

That’s some steep egg prices, and they’re everywhere. According to USINflationCalculator.com, the average price of eggs in 2021 was $1.67, so the prices we’re seeing now are very high.

According to Marketplace.org, part of the reason we see egg prices so high is because the cost of everything is going up, including the cost of chicken feed. However, the biggest problem causing egg prices to skyrocket is bird flu.

Photo by Zachariah Smith on Unsplash

Photo by Zachariah Smith on Unsplash

The CDC has been monitoring the bird flu outbreak and said more than 57 million birds have died either from bird flu or as a result of culling, meaning they were killed due to exposure to bird flu.

The CDC has a map of bird flu outbreaks and in Indiana there have been reports of flocks affected by bird flu in 5 counties. In Dubois County on a commercial turkey farm, a flock of 108,000 had 4 outbreaks of bird flu. For more information on bird flu outbreaks in Indiana, click here.

Photo by Nighthawk Shoots on Unsplash

Photo by Nighthawk Shoots on Unsplash

Marketplace.org has some detailed information on the rising prices of eggs, and they say you may have better luck finding better prices on eggs from smaller farms that haven’t been hit quite as badly by bird flu. You can read more here.

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