How to save money on Thanksgiving dinner

Thanksgiving is just over a week away and we’ve already seen food prices soar with inflation. Grocery shopping has become more expensive for everyone as Thanksgiving approaches, and prices continue to rise. Thanksgiving staple turkey is also more expensive this year. Thanksgiving is all about gratitude, family and, of course, food. Reilly White, an associate professor at the University of New Mexico, says that with inflation and turkey shortages, families can expect to pay a lot more for Thanksgiving dinner. White says that according to the American Farm Bureau Federation, “Thanksgiving dinner will be about 20% more expensive than last year. For example, the whole turkeys, stuffing, cranberries, and pumpkin pie cost about $64 for a meal for ten, and that’s over $10 more than last year.” steadily increased during the 2008 recession. Supply problems have also increased prices this year. “A big driver of that was turkey prices, a 16-pound turkey. Right now, it costs about $29 on average. That’s up 21% from last year,” White said. When you do grocery shopping, White says you should be open-minded about some non-traditional Thanksgiving meals. “For example, beef prices have actually gone down in the last year. So you can think of other foods and other goods to put in that mix for Thanksgiving,” he said. If you have a smaller family of 2-4 people, White says another option is to buy a Thanksgiving meal. “Maybe you can find a better deal by buying. Many of these traditional items look for this information at one of the local restaurants,” White said. Some ways you can try to save money this year are to have a potluck, shop early, and check prices at different stores. You can do that, too use what you already have in your pantry and be creative with your meals.

Thanksgiving is just over a week away and we’ve already seen food prices soar with inflation.

Grocery shopping has become more expensive for everyone as Thanksgiving approaches and prices continue to rise.

Thanksgiving turkey is also more expensive this year. Thanksgiving is all about gratitude, family and, of course, food.

Reilly White, an associate professor at the University of New Mexico, says that with inflation and turkey shortages, families can expect to pay a lot more for Thanksgiving dinner.

White says that according to the American Farm Bureau Federation, “Thanksgiving dinner will be about 20% more expensive than last year. For example, the whole turkey, stuffing, cranberries and pumpkin pie cost about $64 for a meal for 10, which is over $10 more than last year.”

He says turkey prices have risen steadily since the 2008 recession. Supply problems have also increased prices this year.

“A big driver of that was turkey prices, a 16-pound turkey. Right now, it costs about $29 on average. That’s up 21% from last year,” White said.

When you do grocery shopping, White says you should be open-minded about some non-traditional Thanksgiving meals.

“For example, beef prices have actually gone down in the last year. So you can think of other foods and other goods to put in that mix for Thanksgiving,” he said.

If you have a smaller family of 2-4 people, White says another option is to buy a Thanksgiving meal.

“You might find a better deal by buying. A lot of these traditional items look for this information at one of the local restaurants,” White said.

Some ways you can try to save money this year are to have a potluck, shop early, and check prices at different stores.

You can also use what you already have in your pantry and be creative with your meals.

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