Minister Pete Buttigieg speaks about infrastructure during a special visit to New Mexico

US Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg made a special trip to New Mexico to discuss road safety and infrastructure improvements. On Wednesday, his first stop was Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute in northwest Albuquerque. The chairman met with local groups and state agencies such as the New Mexico Department of Transportation to discuss issues affecting drivers. The state has one of the highest pedestrian death rates in the entire county. “Whether it’s the safe roads and streets for all programs or just the general idea, we give grants to improve everything,” Buttigieg said. “So I’ll keep that in mind as I take some of these sample stories that I’ve heard locally in New Mexico.” Later that afternoon, the secretary visited the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center for a roundtable discussion with Pueblo governors and Apache leader. The table continued to discuss infrastructure investment and road safety in tribal communities. For years, tribal leaders have said they were trying to raise money to complete major construction projects. The smaller governments, however, often get nothing. Buttigieg now hopes to step in and develop a new relationship between the US government and the tribal regions. Anything for a change that Native Americans can see in time. “Working with them on how to make sure we make this process a little bit easier, meet any major requirements for using federal dollars that meet them in a way that doesn’t take forever or have processes that double the effort.” “, he said. “Those are the things I think we can unite and make a difference.” Partnering with indigenous leaders is one of the Secretary’s greatest goals during his journey through the Land of Enchantment. He said the change could make a big difference for communities that often lack basic necessities like water, gas and electricity. At the cultural center, Buttigieg also met one-on-one with Buu Nygren, the president-elect of the Navajo Nation. The rising leader said he has many plans when it comes to infrastructure projects in the region. “It’s the hardest thing to find in the Navajo Nation,” Nygren said. Because of this, the cost of building roads in the nation is over $3 million per mile, and there are well over a thousand miles across the Navajo Nation. At this price, it’s really hard to even make it viable. Indigenous peoples have more than twice the national average in traffic fatalities based on population. Buttigieg will continue his travel schedule at the Navajo Nation on Thursday and meet with Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez. The secretary will then travel to Arizona travel meetings with the Hopi nation.

US Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg made a special trip to New Mexico to discuss road safety and infrastructure improvements.

On Wednesday, his first stop was Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute in northwest Albuquerque. The chairman met with local groups and state agencies such as the New Mexico Department of Transportation to discuss issues affecting drivers.

The state has one of the highest pedestrian death rates in the entire county.

“Whether it’s the safe roads and streets for all programs or just the general idea, we give grants to improve everything,” Buttigieg said. “So I’m going to keep that in mind as I take some of these sample stories that I’ve heard locally in New Mexico.”

Later that afternoon, the secretary visited the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center for a round table discussion with Pueblo governors and Apache leaders. The table continued to discuss infrastructure investment and road safety in tribal communities.

For years, tribal leaders have tried to raise money to complete major construction projects.

However, the smaller governments often get nothing.

Buttigieg now hopes to step in and build a new relationship between the US government and the tribal regions.

Anything for a change, Native Americans can see in time.

“By working with them to make sure we make this process a little bit easier, meet any major requirements for using federal dollars that meet them in a way that doesn’t take forever, or have processes that double the effort, he said. “Those are the things I think we can band together and make a difference.”

Partnering with indigenous leaders is one of the Secretary’s greatest goals during his journey through the Land of Enchantment.

He said the change could make a big difference for communities that often lack basic necessities like water, gas and electricity.

At the cultural center, Buttigieg also met with Buu Nygren, the president-elect of the Navajo Nation.

The rising leader said he has many plans when it comes to infrastructure projects in the region.

“It’s the hardest thing to find on the Navajo Nation,” Nygren said. Because of this, the cost of building roads in the nation is over $3 million per mile, and there are well over a thousand miles across the Navajo Nation. At this price, it’s really hard to even make it feasible.”

He added that with Buttigieg’s help and the help of Home Secretary Deb Haaland, the Navajo Nation can get a lot better in the years to come. Especially when it comes to general road safety.

Depending on the population, indigenous peoples have more than twice the national average in road deaths.

Buttigieg will continue his travel schedule at the Navajo Nation on Thursday. He will meet with Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez. The secretary will then travel to Arizona to meet with the Hopi nation.

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