New Mexico public schools are experiencing a decline in student enrollment

Nationwide, enrollment numbers continue to fall. Amanda Aragon of New Mexico Kids Can – a non-profit group dedicated to improving education – said parents want the best for their children. “Any family in the state of New Mexico would agree that none of our children deserve to be in a system that ranks at the bottom of every ranking nationwide,” Aragon said. “What APS is experiencing is certainly not exclusive to APS. We’ve seen a drop in enrollment in all public schools nationwide. We’re seeing particularly large urban areas like Albuquerque Public Schools across the country with higher student rates.” Albuquerque Public School enrollment has dropped by more than 11,000 in 10 years, according to the Kids Count Data Center. At the onset of COVID-19, 89,553 students were enrolled in APS from 2019-2020, compared to 82,329 last school year — more students are losing each year. “If districts don’t go out and try to show their worth to the community to do something about these declining enrollments, these students won’t come back. Those families will not come back,” Aragon said. “Families want an option that they know is best for their children and that really allowed them to explore the full range of those options, be it a traditional district school, a charter school, a private school, a micro school or a homeschooling option where they know they’ll get what they need,” she continued. “They won’t choose that option.” Pandemic removed from Albuquerque Public Schools.”I just realized it really wasn’t the best place for my family. I couldn’t sacrifice my child’s safety and health and mental well-being by staying in the schools. We did.” “I’ve seen how the public schools are evolving. They don’t really support the values, the cultural, traditional beliefs and our beliefs within the schools,” she said trust to do it. I’ve learned that there are a lot of resources to help parents who want to homeschool. We also made the transition to private school.” Despite the challenges, Humphrey said it was worth it. “I am equipped and able to do this for my children. They did it and found they were successful, so they stuck with it,” she said

Nationwide, enrollment numbers continue to fall.

Amanda Aragon of New Mexico Kids Can – a non-profit group dedicated to improving education – said parents want the best for their children.

“Any family in the state of New Mexico would agree that none of our children deserve to be in a system that ranks at the bottom of every ranking nationwide,” Aragon said. “What APS is experiencing is certainly not exclusive to APS. We’ve seen a drop in enrollment in all public schools nationwide. We’re seeing particularly large urban districts like Albuquerque Public Schools across the country with higher student rates.”

Albuquerque public school enrollments have fallen by over 11,000 in 10 years, according to the Kids Count Data Center.

At the onset of COVID-19, 89,553 students were enrolled in APS from 2019-2020, compared to 82,329 last school year — more students are losing each year.

“If districts don’t go out and try to show their worth to the community to do something about these declining enrollments, these students won’t come back. Those families will not come back,” Aragon said. “Families want an option that they know is best for their children and that really allowed them to explore the full range of those options, be it a traditional district school, a charter school, a private school, a micro school or a homeschool option.”

“If parents don’t feel that their schools and their counties have a plan to get it back on track and that they can believe in that plan, and they feel safe about sending their child to the place of learning, to knowing they’re getting what they need,” she continued. “They won’t choose that option.”

Jeannie Humphrey, a mother of three, said she removed her children from Albuquerque public schools in the wake of the pandemic.

“I just realized it really wasn’t the best place for my family. I could not sacrifice my child’s safety and health and mental well being by staying in the schools. We have seen public schools develop. We can’t really support the values, the cultural, traditional beliefs and our beliefs in the schools,” she said. “I really appreciate the public school teachers and everything they do, but I finally had the opportunity to teach my children in the Homeschooling essentially, and I have the confidence to do it. I’ve learned that there are a lot of resources to help parents who want to homeschool. We’ve also made the transition to private school.”

Despite the challenges, Humphrey said it was worth it.

“I am equipped and I can do this for my children. They did it and found they were successful and they stayed that way,” she said.

For more information visit:

APS: School Enrollment by District | KIDS COUNT data center

Nationwide: School enrollment by district | KIDS COUNT data center

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