Quiet and sunny for Black Friday shopping

Sunny and beautiful for Black Friday

It will be a bit chilly if you head out early for Black Friday shopping with temperatures in the 20s. However, I remember (at least I feel like it) that when I was a little kid standing in line at Toys R Us at 3am it was a lot colder! Highs will rise into the mid 40s on Friday in plenty of sunshine. Don’t worry about the weather while hiking by participating in the free state park entry promotion today!

Sunshine will dominate the state Friday with highs in the high 30s in north to the low 50s in southwest Minnesota. These highs are above average – up to 15F!

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Quiet long holiday weekend

For those who like the weather disrupting their holiday travel…well, I have bad news for you this bank holiday long weekend. It’s going to be nice and quiet! There will be more sun on Saturday than Sunday along with warmer temperatures as highs may climb to close to 50F. Behind a frontal system on Sunday and with cloud cover we will only see temperatures in the 30’s. Ignore Sunday’s chance of rain – all chances of precipitation are to our south and east. For those not traveling back before Monday, calm conditions are expected to start the week with mostly overcast skies and highs trying to approach 40F again.

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Keep an eye out for mid next week…

Forecast image of the European model for Tuesday evening at 18:00.

Just a warning – we are monitoring a system that will move through the upper Midwest during midweek next week and could bring rain, freezing rain and snow. Of course, being so far out there are uncertainties as to the overall route, timing etc, but it’s something to keep an eye on until next week.

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Forecast calls for power shopping

By Paul Douglas

Here’s a prediction: If you look back on your life, the stuff you’ve accumulated will be background noise. What matters is who you loved, what you saw and how you made things better. Please forgive my hasty prediction. I have to rush to the mall. I hope I don’t get trampled again this year.

I don’t want to bury the lede: enjoy the weekend of sunshine and relative warmth as winter makes its comeback next week. Confidence in potentially ploughable snowfall levels is growing late Tuesday through midday Wednesday, with another snowstorm a week from Saturday. Within 9 days, daily highs can be stuck in the teens again. This is only a very temporary winter holiday.

Blue skies paired with Pacific air will lure the mercury well into the 40s today and Saturday as some lucky cities hit 50F. Not too shabby considering today’s sun position is January 21st, with 9 hours and 13 minutes of daylight.

A month until Christmas? uh oh Hey Alexa, is there still money in my bank account!!

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Paul’s Extended Twin Cities Prognosis

FRIDAY: Sunny and pleasant. Wake up 29. High 46. Chance of precipitation 0%. Wind SW 7-12mph.

SATURDAY: Blue skies, more airy and mild. Wake up 36. High 49. Chance of precipitation 0%. Wind SW 10-20mph.

SUNDAY: Mostly cloudy and cooler. Wake up 33. High 38. Chance of precipitation 20%. Wind NW 10-20mph.

MONDAY: Partly cloudy, still calm. Wake up 28. High 41. Chance of precipitation 10%. Wind S 8-13mph.

TUESDAY: Snow is coming and mixing with rain. Wake up 31. High 34. Chance of precipitation 80%. Wind NE 8-13 mph.

WEDNESDAY: Snow coming to a head, possibly ploughable? Wake up 18. High 25. Chance of precipitation 90%. Wind NW 15-30mph.

THURSDAY: Partly sunny and brisk. Wake up 9. High 30. Chance of precipitation 10%. Wind S 10-20mph.

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Minneapolis weather almanac and solar data
11/25

*Length of the day: 9 hours, 12 minutes and 7 seconds
*Daylight LOST since yesterday: 1 minute and 53 seconds

*When do we fall below 9 hours of daylight?: December 3 (8 hours, 59 minutes, 4 seconds)
*Last sunrise: December 30 – January 5 (7:51 am)
*Earliest sunset: December 5 to December 13 (4:31 p.m.)

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This day in weather history
11/25

1977: Record lows are being set across central Minnesota with lows in the teens below zero. Montevideo had the coldest temperature of 18 degrees below zero along with Long Prairie with 16 degrees below zero.

1820: Ft. Snelling is in the middle of a three-day snowstorm that would drop nine inches of snow.

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National Weather Forecast

Showers and thunderstorms are possible in the deep south Friday, some of which could be intense due to a near frontal boundary and areas of low pressure. The back of this system in parts of New Mexico and West Texas will see snow and mixed precipitation. A frontal boundary moving east brings rain, snow, and ice to the east coast. Meanwhile, a system in the Pacific Northwest brings chances of rain and snow.

Very heavy rain is expected to fall in parts of the lower Mississippi Valley and Southern Plains over the next few days, with precipitation totals of 3 to 5 inches possible. On the cold side (in west Texas and New Mexico) several inches of snow is expected to fall.

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This scorching “super-Earth” exoplanet is one of the most massive ever discovered

More from Space.com: “As astronomers expand their known population of distant planets — called exoplanets — they expand their understanding of how Earth’s rocky cousins ​​appear around other stars. And their investigations often come across oddities, like a newly discovered planet covered in molten magma whose “year” lasts only half a day. The discovery, named TOI-1075 b, was spotted in observations from NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) spacecraft. Data from this four-year-old mission showed that TOI-1075 b has a superheated surface of about 1,050 degrees Celsius. These extreme conditions occur because of the planet’s proximity to its parent star, a small, red-orange star about 200 light-years from Earth. But besides the planet’s scorching climate and ultra-short orbit — lasting just 14.5 hours — it’s intriguing for another important reason: TOI-1075 b is one of the most massive of its class of exoplanets. “New data show TOI-1075 b is one of the most massive super-Earths discovered to date,” NASA officials wrote in a Nov. 8 announcement (opens in new tab) about the discovery.

Young people just got a louder voice on climate change — and could soon be shaping policy

More from CNBC: “Young people have long been at the forefront of debate and activism around climate change. This year’s COP27 was another milestone for them – they became official stakeholders in climate policy as part of the ACE action plan that was prepared at COP27 in Egypt in the last few weeks. The voices and opinions of young people will now be much more powerful when it comes to shaping and implementing climate policy, says Hailey Campbell, one of the negotiators who made this possible. “Official recognition as a stakeholder for the ACE Action Plan gives young people the international support we need to demand our formal involvement in climate change decision-making and implementation,” she told CNBC’s Make It.

Climate change will make El Niño and La Niña stronger by 2030 – 40 years earlier than previously thought

More from Discover Magazine: “The La Niña climate phenomenon – now in its third year and expected to last into winter – has brought even more cooling to the waters around the archipelago. And in the longer term, the cool oceanic patch in and around the Galápagos Islands has indeed stifled the effects of global warming. According to recent research, it has cooled by 0.9 degrees Fahrenheit since the early 1990s, thanks to a strengthening and shifting of one of the deep-sea currents that bring cool water to the region. “There’s a tug-of-war between our greenhouse effect, which causes warming from above, and the cold ocean currents,” says Kris Karnauskas, study author and researcher at the University of Colorado. “At the moment the ocean currents are winning – not only are they staying cool, they’re getting cooler year by year,” Karnauskas is quoted as saying in a statement from the university.

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Thanks for checking in and have a nice day! Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter (@dkayserwx) and like me on Facebook (Meteorologist DJ Kayser).

– DJ Kayser

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